On April 14th, the Congregation Show is returning to Charlotte, North Carolina, bigger and better than ever. A collaboration between our friends at DicE Magazine and Prism Supply Company, the invitation-only show brings a carefully curated blend of traditional motorcycles, hot rods and custom cars to the historic Camp North End. Recently, we were asked if we could help select 40-60 traditional rods, customs and racecars to invite to their second-annual show and naturally, we thought of you—our readers.

The Congregation Show brings some of the East Coast's best rods, customs and motorcycles to Camp North End for an event like none other. Tim Payne's chopped '34 Ford pickup had plenty of mid-'50s flair, from the 3x2-fed smallblock to the gold paint with white detailing. It looked at home on the brick show floor.

The Congregation Show brings some of the East Coast’s best rods, customs and motorcycles to Camp North End for an event like none other. Tim Payne’s chopped ’34 Ford pickup had plenty of mid-’50s flair, from the 3×2-fed smallblock to the gold paint with white detailing. It looked at home on the brick show floor.

Think your—or a friend’s—car should be invited? Or how about your car club? Will you be free that weekend? If you answered yes, send us an email to editorial@roddersjournal.com with the subject “Congregation Show.” Make sure to include your contact information or you will not be eligible.

 

Camp North End is a massive, multi-building complex that has served a wide range of purposes in the past 90+ years; Ford used two of the oldest buildings for Model T and A production in the ’20s and ’30s. With such rich history, it’s only fitting that there will be an abundance of traditional machinery on the grounds come show time.

From mild-custom Buicks to chopped Mercs to fat-fendered Fords, the Congregation show is focused on traditionally styled cars and bikes. Dustin Corl's '40 Ford sedan, right, was originally hot rodded decades ago.

From mild-custom Buicks to chopped Mercs to fat-fendered Fords, the Congregation show is focused on traditionally styled cars and bikes. Dustin Corl’s ’40 Ford sedan, right, was originally hot rodded decades ago.

You can also post a photo of your entry on Facebook or Instagram using #roddersjournal and #congregationshow. While you’re at it, make sure to give @thecongregationshow a follow. (And @dicemagazine and @prismsupply if you’re a motorcycle fan.) Likes will be taken into consideration but will not be the deciding factor.

 The Congregation brings together some of the East Coast’s best machines on two and four wheels. It’s a bike show. It’s a car show—and it’s the place to be this spring if you appreciate vintage iron of all kinds.

 For more about the show, check out their official website here. Stay tuned for more about the Congregation in the not-so-distant future.

Jim Powers' Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based '57 Chevy blends show and go, early-'60s style. The piecrust slicks and chrome reverse wheels give that extra hint of street race flavor.

Jim Powers’ Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based ’57 Chevy blends show and go, early-’60s style. The piecrust slicks and chrome reverse wheels give that extra hint of street race flavor.

 

Just like indoor car shows of yesteryear, hot bikes share the floor with hot rods at the Congregation. Here's show organizer and DicE co-founder Dean Micetich's Harley-Davidson Panhead on display at Camp North End.

Just like indoor car shows of yesteryear, hot bikes share the floor with hot rods at the Congregation. Here’s show organizer and DicE co-founder Dean Micetich’s Harley-Davidson Panhead on display at Camp North End.

 

It's hard to beat an A-V8, especially when they're as clean as this Hemi-powered roadster from last year's show. Highlights include a sectioned Deuce grille shell, chopped windshield and 3x2-intake.

It’s hard to beat an A-V8, especially when they’re as clean as this Hemi-powered roadster from last year’s show. Highlights include a sectioned Deuce grille shell, chopped windshield and 3×2-intake.

 

Prism Supply Company may be a new name to some, but they're known across the world for their traditional motorcycle projects, like this full-rigid Panhead that they built at their shop in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Prism Supply Company may be a new name to some, but they’re known across the world for their traditional motorcycle projects, like this full-rigid Panhead that they built at their shop in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The Congregation 2018