We hope you all had a happy and safe new year. After taking a brief break to ring in 2014, we jumped right back into production of our next issue, TRJ #62, which will be printing next week. We’ll bring you a sneak peek of what’s in store soon, but first we wanted to share some of the outtakes and extras from issue #61, which is currently on newsstands.

We thoroughly enjoyed talking with Rick Barakat and Pete Eastwood about their recreation of the famed Eastwood-Barakat Deuce Tudor. The two have been friends for decades, and the stories they shared about building, racing, and tearing up the streets of Southern California in their hot rods are priceless.

We thoroughly enjoyed talking with Rick Barakat and Pete Eastwood about their recreation of the famed Eastwood-Barakat Deuce Tudor. The two have been friends for decades, and the stories they shared about building, racing, and tearing up the streets of Southern California in their hot rods are priceless. They’re seen here in 1982 at Baylands Raceway in Fremont, California, where the Eastwood-Barakat Deuce took its first stand. Rick, on the right, sprayed their ’48 Ford sedan delivery tow car in matching Ditzler red oxide lacquer primer. As the numbers on the delivery’s windshield indicate, the Tudor wasn’t the only Eastwood-Barakat entry to blast down the quarter mile that day.

 

Our feature on Bruce Meyer focuses on two historic Deuces in his collection: the iconic Doane Spencer roadster, seen here, and the Bob Morris “Nickel” roadster. We always enjoy spending time with Bruce, and on this visit we were treated to a tour of his recently completed garage in Beverly Hills, California. The '20s-era parking garage now houses his carefully curated collection of hot rods and competition cars, like the Pierson Brothers’ coupe and the Greer-Black-Prudhomme Top Fueler, along with American classics, European sports cars, and vintage motorcycles. The weathered looking “Used Cars” sign above the antique Norton and Matchless cycles is actually the work of Austin-based artist Todd Sanders.

Our feature on Bruce Meyer focuses on two historic Deuces in his collection: the iconic Doane Spencer roadster, seen here, and the Bob Morris “Nickel” roadster. We always enjoy spending time with Bruce, and on this visit we were treated to a tour of his recently completed garage in Beverly Hills, California. The ’20s-era parking garage now houses his carefully curated collection of hot rods and competition cars, like the Pierson Brothers’ coupe and the Greer-Black-Prudhomme Top Fueler, along with American classics, European sports cars, and vintage motorcycles. The weathered looking “Used Cars” sign above the antique Norton and Matchless cycles is actually the work of Austin-based artist Todd Sanders.

 

Speaking of Austin, we traveled to the Lone Star State to photograph Mike Young’s '48 Buick Special sedanette at the Austin Country Club. We first saw the beautiful black cherry sled at the Lonestar Round Up in April, and were surprised to learn Mike has had the car on the road for several years. And he drives the wheels off of it; shortly after we shot these photos he drove it on a 3,000-mile round trip to Baltimore for the 2nd Annual TRJ Revival. While the car is a stunner from any angle, Mike built it to highlight the incredible work of legendary upholsterer Joe Perez. We’re glad we had the opportunity to talk with Joe and to tell the story of his days working alongside Eddie Martinez in the heyday of early Southern California customizing.

Speaking of Austin, we traveled to the Lone Star State to photograph Mike Young’s ’48 Buick Special sedanette at the Austin Country Club. We first saw the beautiful black cherry sled at the Lonestar Round Up in April, and were surprised to learn Mike has had the car on the road for several years. And he drives the wheels off of it; shortly after we shot these photos he drove it on a 3,000-mile round trip to Baltimore for the 2nd Annual TRJ Revival. While the car is a stunner from any angle, Mike built it to highlight the incredible work of legendary upholsterer Joe Perez. We’re glad we had the opportunity to talk with Joe and to tell the story of his days working alongside Eddie Martinez in the heyday of early Southern California customizing.

 

We photographed Dean Murray’s restored Murray and Waters “Triple Nickel” Model A drag roadster at the airport in Paso Robles. Dean campaigned the car with Mike Waters throughout the mid-'50s, running under flathead, GMC inline six-cylinder, Chrysler Hemi, and ultimately smallblock Chevy power. Their first car, however, was another Model A with a flathead that they originally built in '52. They partnered with So-Cal Speed Shop for a brief period in '53, during which time the car was painted in red and white So-Cal livery. While the Triple Nickel is based on as many parts of the original car as could be salvaged, the So-Cal drag roadster is a tribute built by Formula One Air Racing pilot and plane restorer Chuck Wentworth.

We photographed Dean Murray’s restored Murray and Waters “Triple Nickel” Model A drag roadster at the airport in Paso Robles. Dean campaigned the car with Mike Waters throughout the mid-’50s, running under flathead, GMC inline six-cylinder, Chrysler Hemi, and ultimately smallblock Chevy power. Their first car, however, was another Model A with a flathead that they originally built in ’52. They partnered with So-Cal Speed Shop for a brief period in ’53, during which time the car was painted in red and white So-Cal livery. While the Triple Nickel is based on as many parts of the original car as could be salvaged, the So-Cal drag roadster is a tribute built by Formula One Air Racing pilot and plane restorer Chuck Wentworth.

 

We couldn’t resist showing another shot of Greg Hopkins’ barn find hot rod. Greg bought the roadster in Colorado and drove it 1,700 miles to his home in Dothan, Alabama. He made the trip by himself, taking only “blue highways”–roads that wind through the American countryside and are typically marked on maps in blue–snapping photos like this shot from Route 66 in Kansas. We got to spend some additional time with Greg when he brought the roadster to the Revival. He likes to work with old and obsolete photography equipment and processes, and he achieved some neat results shooting Revival participant’s cars with the collodion wet plate process that transfers ghostly images to aluminum or glass plates.

We couldn’t resist showing another shot of Greg Hopkins’ barn find hot rod. Greg bought the roadster in Colorado and drove it 1,700 miles to his home in Dothan, Alabama. He made the trip by himself, taking only “blue highways”–roads that wind through the American countryside and are typically marked on maps in blue–snapping photos like this shot from Route 66 in Kansas. We got to spend some additional time with Greg when he brought the roadster to the Revival. He likes to work with old and obsolete photography equipment and processes, and he achieved some neat results shooting Revival participant’s cars with the collodion wet plate process that transfers ghostly images to aluminum or glass plates.

 

While much of the photography in our S&S Racing Team feature is from the ‘60s, we also spent an afternoon at Maryland’s historic 75-80 Dragway photographing the team members’ current cars. Dave Hales’ D/Gas (and later C/Gas) '37 Willys survives today. He has meticulously restored it to its mid-'60s configuration. To the left is longtime crewmember Roger Spinks’ lowered '59 El Camino. It replicates S&S Parts Company owner Chuck Stolze’s shop truck from the '60s. Fred Bear built the '49 Anglia at right as a nostalgia race-legal tribute to their good friend and teammate Gene Altizer (who was one of the team’s most successful competitors and shared a number of great stories and photos with us for our story). Fred also owns the early Hemi-powered '55 Nomad, which he transports along with several other nostalgia Gassers with his custom RV. This evening we stayed well past sunset, listening to old racing stories and enjoying every minute of it.

While much of the photography in our S&S Racing Team feature is from the ‘60s, we also spent an afternoon at Maryland’s historic 75-80 Dragway photographing the team members’ current cars. Dave Hales’ D/Gas (and later C/Gas) ’37 Willys survives today. He has meticulously restored it to its mid-’60s configuration. To the left is longtime crewmember Roger Spinks’ lowered ’59 El Camino. It replicates S&S Parts Company owner Chuck Stolze’s shop truck from the ’60s. Fred Bear built the ’49 Anglia at right as a nostalgia race-legal tribute to their good friend and teammate Gene Altizer (who was one of the team’s most successful competitors and shared a number of great stories and photos with us for our story). Fred also owns the early Hemi-powered ’55 Nomad, which he transports along with several other nostalgia Gassers with his custom RV. This evening we stayed well past sunset, listening to old racing stories and enjoying every minute of it.