Scrapbook has been one of our best selling books since its release in 2011 and now there is only a very limited supply left. With Christmas approaching the few remaining copies are flying off our shelves, so if you want a copy for yourself (or your favorite hot rodder), click here or give us a call today.

The handsome hardbound volume explores the history of hot rodding from the ’30s through the early-’70s. And at nearly 500 pages for just $50, it’s no wonder it’s a favorite among TRJ readers. Here we have included outtakes and some photos which actually appeared in Scrapbook.

Of the two dozen plus chapters in Scrapbook the one that covers Ken Crawford’s hot rodding exploits is among our favorites. Ken was active in the Southern California lakes and drag racing scenes from the 1940s through the 1960s. Perhaps his finest hour came in 1963 when he campaigned a Kent Fuller-chassied C/Fuel Dragster. It had an injected smallblock Chevy engine, ran 8-second quarter-mile times and won the “Outstanding Performance of the Meet” award at Bakersfield that year. Whether he was spectating or racing Ken took plenty of pictures many of which are 35mm Kodachrome slides and captured the essence of the golden age of California hot rodding.

Of the two dozen plus chapters in Scrapbook the one that covers Ken Crawford’s hot rodding exploits is among our favorites. Ken was active in the Southern California lakes and drag racing scenes from the 1940s through the 1960s. Perhaps his finest hour came in 1963 when he campaigned a Kent Fuller-chassied C/Fuel Dragster. It had an injected smallblock Chevy engine, ran 8-second quarter-mile times and won the “Outstanding Performance of the Meet” award at Bakersfield that year. Whether he was spectating or racing Ken took plenty of pictures many of which are 35mm Kodachrome slides and captured the essence of the golden age of California hot rodding.

Jim and Jason Smith run the Hot Rod Garage in Sand Springs, Oklahoma. Each year they have an open house under the auspicious of the Tulsa Timing Association Reunion. The event draws plenty of hot rodder’s from the sports early days in the Tulsa area and they bring along their photo collections as well. We featured the photos of Oklahoma rodders Art Maimbourg, Jim Perkins and John Robison in Scrapbook. Robison remembers attending the NHRA National drags in 1955 at Great Bend, Kansas. While there he snapped this shot of Bill Breece’s Olds-powered ’32 three-window. Breece attended the drags while en route from his home in Lima, Ohio, to the West Coast.

Jim and Jason Smith run the Hot Rod Garage in Sand Springs, Oklahoma. Each year they have an open house under the auspicious of the Tulsa Timing Association Reunion. The event draws plenty of hot rodder’s from the sports early days in the Tulsa area and they bring along their photo collections as well. We featured the photos of Oklahoma rodders Art Maimbourg, Jim Perkins and John Robison in Scrapbook. Robison remembers attending the NHRA National drags in 1955 at Great Bend, Kansas. While there he snapped this shot of Bill Breece’s Olds-powered ’32 three-window. Breece attended the drags while en route from his home in Lima, Ohio, to the West Coast.

What’s unique about Scrapbook is that it chronicles hot rodding’s past through the personal images and stories of the people who were there. Each of the 27 chapters highlights a different contributor, sharing their memories and photos from cross-country road trips, weekends at drag strips and car shows, and time spent in garages where the hot rods and custom cars that defined our sport were built.

Photos from as far back as 1930s dry lakes racing to as late as the first two Street Rod Nationals in 1970 and ’71 are showcased. Some are in rich, full color, some are in warm sepia tones, and all are reproduced with an eye for preserving the character they’ve earned over the decades. We’ve gone to great lengths to identify as many of the cars, owners, and other details as possible, from the most famous to the virtually unknown. And every corner of the United States is represented, from Pennsylvania to California and Texas to Montana.

Scrapbook is a must-have for any rod or custom enthusiast with an interest in our hobby’s true traditional roots. But with very limited quantities left and with no plans for a reprint, now may be your last opportunity to own it. Click here or call us at (800) 750-9550 (U.S.) or (877) 479-2627 (Canada) to order today, and be sure to specify the appropriate shipping method to guarantee delivery by Christmas.

Chicago area rodder John Serafini sent us photos of his very cool ’60s-style ’40 Ford coupe, which we used in Scrapbook. But perhaps the highlight of the chapter were his stories and images of flat towing a Forty sedan delivery cross-country after purchasing it from Tom Beatty. What we didn’t have room for in the book were any of John’s snapshots of ‘60s Mid West drag racing. Shown here is a chopped and channeled Model A coupe with injected-Hemi power. We love the era when you could still find a fair number of early-model machines in the pits alongside the latest muscle machines from Detroit. The Mopar stocker and the ’67 Impala provide a nice juxtaposition to the Model A.

Chicago area rodder John Serafini sent us photos of his very cool ’60s-style ’40 Ford coupe, which we used in Scrapbook. But perhaps the highlight of the chapter were his stories and images of flat towing a Forty sedan delivery cross-country after purchasing it from Tom Beatty. What we didn’t have room for in the book were any of John’s snapshots of ‘60s Mid West drag racing. Shown here is a chopped and channeled Model A coupe with injected-Hemi power. We love the era when you could still find a fair number of early-model machines in the pits alongside the latest muscle machines from Detroit. The Mopar stocker and the ’67 Impala provide a nice juxtaposition to the Model A.

We were able to track down Altoona, Pennsylvania, hot rodder after close examination of an old scrapbook that memorabilia dealer Mike Goyda got at auction. John bought a “cream puff” ’39 Ford convert off a used car lot in ’54, sold it 1966, bought it back in 1986 and still has it today. Included in his old scrapbook were photos of this complete but rusty ’34 Ford roadster and a ’39 DeLuxe coupe that he spotted at the drags in Akron, Ohio.

We were able to track down Altoona, Pennsylvania, hot rodder after close examination of an old scrapbook that memorabilia dealer Mike Goyda got at auction. John bought a “cream puff” ’39 Ford convert off a used car lot in ’54, sold it 1966, bought it back in 1986 and still has it today. Included in his old scrapbook were photos of this complete but rusty ’34 Ford roadster and a ’39 DeLuxe coupe that he spotted at the drags in Akron, Ohio.

We were able to track down Altoona, Pennsylvania, hot rodder after close examination of an old scrapbook that memorabilia dealer Mike Goyda got at auction. John bought a “cream puff” ’39 Ford convert off a used car lot in ’54, sold it 1966, bought it back in 1986 and still has it today. Included in his old scrapbook were photos of this complete but rusty ’34 Ford roadster and a ’39 DeLuxe coupe that he spotted at the drags in Akron, Ohio.

 

Lloyd Willey grew up in the 1950s in Rapid City, South Dakota, where there was an active hot rod and custom car community. Lloyd built a mild-custom ’51 Ford Vicky that was neat enough to gain him entry into the Rapid Shifters car club. Among his snapshots were photos of this mild-custom ’54 Ford hardtop and the engine in Jim Nueuzil’s ’51 Chevy Business Coupe. The fully detailed six-banger was fitted with a Fenton dual-carb intake and a polished aluminum valve cover.

Lloyd Willey grew up in the 1950s in Rapid City, South Dakota, where there was an active hot rod and custom car community. Lloyd built a mild-custom ’51 Ford Vicky that was neat enough to gain him entry into the Rapid Shifters car club. Among his snapshots were photos of this mild-custom ’54 Ford hardtop and the engine in Jim Nueuzil’s ’51 Chevy Business Coupe. The fully detailed six-banger was fitted with a Fenton dual-carb intake and a polished aluminum valve cover.

Lloyd Willey grew up in the 1950s in Rapid City, South Dakota, where there was an active hot rod and custom car community. Lloyd built a mild-custom ’51 Ford Vicky that was neat enough to gain him entry into the Rapid Shifters car club. Among his snapshots were photos of this mild-custom ’54 Ford hardtop and the engine in Jim Nueuzil’s ’51 Chevy Business Coupe. The fully detailed six-banger was fitted with a Fenton dual-carb intake and a polished aluminum valve cover.

 

Mario Baffico was born and raised in San Francisco, where he still makes his home. He visited our offices, scrapbooks in hand, and told stories of going everywhere from the Indy 500, to Bonneville, the drags, dirt-track races and down to Los Angeles for the very first Motorama. At Bonneville, Mario photographed this Deuce-shelled Model A highboy, at the Motorama he captured the chopped and sectioned ’34 Ford coupe built by Joaquin Arnett and later owned by Andy Granatelli and finally he shot this flathead V8-powered Model T roadster on the streets of L.A.

Mario Baffico was born and raised in San Francisco, where he still makes his home. He visited our offices, scrapbooks in hand, and told stories of going everywhere from the Indy 500, to Bonneville, the drags, dirt-track races and down to Los Angeles for the very first Motorama. At Bonneville, Mario photographed this Deuce-shelled Model A highboy, at the Motorama he captured the chopped and sectioned ’34 Ford coupe built by Joaquin Arnett and later owned by Andy Granatelli and finally he shot this flathead V8-powered Model T roadster on the streets of L.A.

 

Mario Baffico was born and raised in San Francisco, where he still makes his home. He visited our offices, scrapbooks in hand, and told stories of going everywhere from the Indy 500, to Bonneville, the drags, dirt-track races and down to Los Angeles for the very first Motorama. At Bonneville, Mario photographed this Deuce-shelled Model A highboy, at the Motorama he captured the chopped and sectioned ’34 Ford coupe built by Joaquin Arnett and later owned by Andy Granatelli and finally he shot this flathead V8-powered Model T roadster on the streets of L.A.

Mario Baffico was born and raised in San Francisco, where he still makes his home. He visited our offices, scrapbooks in hand, and told stories of going everywhere from the Indy 500, to Bonneville, the drags, dirt-track races and down to Los Angeles for the very first Motorama. At Bonneville, Mario photographed this Deuce-shelled Model A highboy, at the Motorama he captured the chopped and sectioned ’34 Ford coupe built by Joaquin Arnett and later owned by Andy Granatelli and finally he shot this flathead V8-powered Model T roadster on the streets of L.A.

 

The Tulsa Timing Association Reunion turned up far more vintage photos from the early days of the Oklahoma rod and custom scene than we could fit into Scrapbook. The ’41 Ford was owned by a local motorcycle racer who used the convertible to tow his bikes to the track. John Robison not only took this photo, but owned the Chuck Porter F-1 pickup as well. Porter chopped and channeled the cab and shortly before selling it to Robison, fitted it with a brand new Cadillac dual-quad V8. The truck now belongs to Dick Munz, but John Robison still has the receipt for the engine that he obtained from Porter at the time of the sale.

The Tulsa Timing Association Reunion turned up far more vintage photos from the early days of the Oklahoma rod and custom scene than we could fit into Scrapbook. The ’41 Ford was owned by a local motorcycle racer who used the convertible to tow his bikes to the track. John Robison not only took this photo, but owned the Chuck Porter F-1 pickup as well. Porter chopped and channeled the cab and shortly before selling it to Robison, fitted it with a brand new Cadillac dual-quad V8. The truck now belongs to Dick Munz, but John Robison still has the receipt for the engine that he obtained from Porter at the time of the sale.

The Tulsa Timing Association Reunion turned up far more vintage photos from the early days of the Oklahoma rod and custom scene than we could fit into Scrapbook. The ’41 Ford was owned by a local motorcycle racer who used the convertible to tow his bikes to the track. John Robison not only took this photo, but owned the Chuck Porter F-1 pickup as well. Porter chopped and channeled the cab and shortly before selling it to Robison, fitted it with a brand new Cadillac dual-quad V8. The truck now belongs to Dick Munz, but John Robison still has the receipt for the engine that he obtained from Porter at the time of the sale.

 

In 1950 Steve Box left his Albuquerque, New Mexico, home and drove to Southern California and on to Bonneville in his ’46 Ford coupe before returning home to start college. He later moved with his family to La Jolla, California, which is near San Diego, and tells of chaperoning his younger brother on a date with Raquel Welch while at the wheel of his ’50 Merc custom convert. While at Bonneville he captured this shot of both the Pierson Brothers racecar-nosed ’34 Coupe and their ’36 three-window, which by this point had largely been regulated to tow-car duties.

In 1950 Steve Box left his Albuquerque, New Mexico, home and drove to Southern California and on to Bonneville in his ’46 Ford coupe before returning home to start college. He later moved with his family to La Jolla, California, which is near San Diego, and tells of chaperoning his younger brother on a date with Raquel Welch while at the wheel of his ’50 Merc custom convert. While at Bonneville he captured this shot of both the Pierson Brothers racecar-nosed ’34 Coupe and their ’36 three-window, which by this point had largely been regulated to tow-car duties.

 

Tom Davison is an artist, painter and photographer that has been practicing his crafts since the 1960s. He spent his teenage years in Kansas City and became a fixture of the Mid West show car scene that centered around Ray Farhner's indoor car shows. Tom painted cars as well as monster shirts while traveling from coast-to-coast. On one of his trips to California in the late-'60s he grabbed a couple of snapshots of Dan Woods’ Milk Truck and Sheldon Bardin’s first Model T sedan. 

Tom Davison is an artist, painter and photographer that has been practicing his crafts since the 1960s. He spent his teenage years in Kansas City and became a fixture of the Mid West show car scene that centered around Ray Farhner's indoor car shows. Tom painted cars as well as monster shirts while traveling from coast-to-coast. On one of his trips to California in the late-'60s he grabbed a couple of snapshots of Dan Woods’ Milk Truck and Sheldon Bardin’s first Model T sedan. 

Tom Davison is an artist, painter and photographer that has been practicing his crafts since the 1960s. He spent his teenage years in Kansas City and became a fixture of the Mid West show car scene that centered around Ray Farhner’s indoor car shows. Tom painted cars as well as monster shirts while traveling from coast-to-coast. On one of his trips to California in the late-’60s he grabbed a couple of snapshots of Dan Woods’ Milk Truck and Sheldon Bardin’s first Model T sedan.