More than 400 hot rods and customs will roll into the Duke Convention Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, for the 56th annual Cavalcade of Customs from Friday, January 8th until Sunday, January 10th. Along with the glitz, glamour, impeccable detailing and intricate displays, 74 barn finds and nostalgic hot rods will take over Survivor’s Alley—a show within the show.

Originally put on by the Squires car club of northern Kentucky, the Cavalcade of Customs has been a Midwestern staple since 1960. Nowadays, it’s an ISCA event drawing some of the country’s top show rods to southwestern Ohio.

The Duke Convention Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, will host more than 70 traditional hot rods and racecars this weekend at the 13th annual Survivor's Alley. The show is part of the Federated Auto Parts Cavalcade of Customs.

The Duke Convention Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, will host more than 70 traditional hot rods and racecars this weekend at the 13th annual Survivor’s Alley. The show is part of the Federated Auto Parts Cavalcade of Customs.

Staying true to the name of the show, this Hemi-powered '33 Plymouth has been stored in an Erlanger, Kentucky, garage for nearly 50 years and will be making an appearance in Survivor's Alley. Ben Bowman now owns the car, and he plans to keep it almost exactly as 17-year-old Dick Arnett built it in '63.

Staying true to the name of the show, this Hemi-powered ’33 Plymouth has been stored in an Erlanger, Kentucky, garage for nearly 50 years and will be making an appearance in Survivor’s Alley. Ben Bowman now owns the car, and he plans to keep it almost exactly as 17-year-old Dick Arnett built it in ’63.

Those who love barn finds, old-time hot rods and long-lost racecars need not look any further than Survivor’s Alley. It’s similar to the Detroit Autorama Extreme because it focuses on traditional and historic cars. From Sprint Cars to slingshots, Survivor’s Alley organizer Joshua Shaw tries to bring in something for everyone.

In 1928, Packard engineer Jesse Vincent worked to create the sleekest, most stripped down machine possible using factory parts. The result was the Vincent Speedster, which is now housed at the Packard Museum in Dayton, Ohio. Here it's seen outside the Duke Convention Center.

In 1928, Packard engineer Jesse Vincent worked to create the sleekest, most stripped down machine possible using factory parts. The result was the Vincent Speedster, which is now housed at the Packard Museum in Dayton, Ohio. Here it’s seen outside the Duke Convention Center.

Survivor’s Alley started as a four-car gathering in 2003, and it soon turned into one of the Cavalcade’s biggest attractions. Shaw and his father, Dan, hand pick each entry and pack them into a space originally designated for 40 cars. This year, there will be everything from factory-built pre-war specials to flip-top Funny Cars parked among the smattering of hot rods and street machines.

Not all entries are displayed in as-found condition, but Shaw encourages owners to keep their cars looking as original as possible. He says people have been excited about the survivors because they give us an accurate idea of how cars were built during our hobby’s Golden Era.

Two of the cars raced by A.J. Foyt made their way into Survivor's Alley earlier this week: Foyt's #11 Sprint Car from the '70s and the Offy-powered "Nowicke Fastener Special" Midget. The #11 car was unearthed from the basement of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame for this weekend's show.

Two of the cars raced by A.J. Foyt made their way into Survivor’s Alley earlier this week: Foyt’s #11 Sprint Car from the ’70s and the Offy-powered “Nowicke Fastener Special” Midget. The #11 car was unearthed from the basement of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame for this weekend’s show.

Along with the barn finds and hot rods, Shaw strives to dig cars out of museums for the public to see. For the 2016 show, he has reunited a trio of racecars (two Sprint Cars and a Midget) driven by A.J. Foyt, which he says was no easy task.

But perhaps the biggest draw for Shaw is convincing owners to bring local cars out of hiding for the masses to enjoy once again. Many owners are self-conscious about their car’s checked lacquer and pitted chrome before the show, but by the end of the weekend they see peoples’ reactions and realize they’ll never change a thing.

ack Chrisman's '67 Mercury Cyclone is one of two funny cars that will be on display in Cincinnati. Jim Barillaro restored the S.O.H.C.-powered flopper as well as Chrisman's '65 Comet back in the 1980s.

ack Chrisman’s ’67 Mercury Cyclone is one of two funny cars that will be on display in Cincinnati. Jim Barillaro restored the S.O.H.C.-powered flopper as well as Chrisman’s ’65 Comet back in the 1980s.