The 64th Annual Detroit Autorama kicks off Friday, drawing hot rodders and customizers from around the world for an action-packed weekend in The Motor City. We’ll be posting photos all weekend on the Rodder’s Journal Instagram as some of the finest hot rods, customs and racecars fill the floors of Cobo Hall. The show runs Friday through Sunday, and while many events advertise there’s “something for everyone,” we’d argue that in the case of the Detroit Autorama, that’s absolutely true.

The 64th Annual Detroit Autorama kicks off Friday, drawing hot rodders and customizers from around the world for an action-packed weekend in The Motor City. We’ll be posting photos all weekend on the Rodder’s Journal Instagram as some of the finest hot rods, customs and racecars fill the floors of Cobo Hall. The show runs Friday through Sunday, and while many events advertise there’s “something for everyone,” we’d argue that in the case of the Detroit Autorama, that’s absolutely true.

The 64th Annual Detroit Autorama kicks off Friday, drawing hot rodders and customizers from around the world for an action-packed weekend in The Motor City. We’ll be posting photos all weekend on the Rodder’s Journal Instagram as some of the finest hot rods, customs and racecars fill the floors of Cobo Hall. The show runs Friday through Sunday, and while many events advertise there’s “something for everyone,” we’d argue that in the case of the Detroit Autorama, that’s absolutely true.

Hilton Hotrods and Ross Racing Engines are at it again, this time with Bob Gratton's blown nailhead-powered Model A. The Florida-bound coupe will be one of several of the Hilton/Ross "Angry As" on display on the main show floor. Photo by Tony Lombardi.

Hilton Hotrods and Ross Racing Engines are at it again, this time with Bob Gratton’s blown nailhead-powered Model A. The Florida-bound coupe will be one of several of the Hilton/Ross “Angry As” on display on the main show floor. Photo by Tony Lombardi.

Back in the early-’50s, the Michigan Hot Rod Association hosted the Detroit Autorama to help raise money to build a drag strip. The show was a success from the start, and it wasn’t long before the hot rodders met their goal and constructed Motor City Dragway in New Baltimore, Michigan. Since then, the Autorama has continued to grow into one of our hobby’s biggest events.

If you’re interested in the history of hot rodding in the Motor City, make sure to check out Hot Rod Detroit in our TRJ Library. Published by Bob Larivee Sr., the book takes an exclusive look at everything from the earliest Michigan car clubs and show cars to some of the area’s most prominent builders including Bill Hines, Chuck Miller and the Alexander Brothers. Click here to find out more, or give us a call at (800) 750-9550 in the U.S., (877) 479-2627 in Canada or (650) 246-8920 internationally.

If you’re interested in the history of hot rodding in the Motor City, make sure to check out Hot Rod Detroit in our TRJ Library. Published by Bob Larivee Sr., the book takes an exclusive look at everything from the earliest Michigan car clubs and show cars to some of the area’s most prominent builders including Bill Hines, Chuck Miller and the Alexander Brothers. Click here to find out more, or give us a call at (800) 750-9550 in the U.S., (877) 479-2627 in Canada or (650) 246-8920 internationally.

As soon as the show opens early Friday afternoon, both levels of Cobo Hall will fill with spectators. Some people are there to see the ultra-detailed Great Eight contenders poised on their turntables, preparing to duke it out for the coveted Ridler, while others can’t wait to dive into the subterranean level to study the ’50s and ’60s-style hot rods, customs and survivors parked in the Autorama Extreme. There’s no wrong way to approach the Autorama, as long as you carve out enough time to see it all.

Mike and Jim Barillaro of Barillaro Speed Emporium brought their freshly completed ex-Pete Eastwood Model A roadster and flathead-powered belly tank to the Autorama from Knoxville, Tennessee. They're set up in the basement for the Autorama Extreme. Photo by Dave Gray

Mike and Jim Barillaro of Barillaro Speed Emporium brought their freshly completed ex-Pete Eastwood Model A roadster and flathead-powered belly tank to the Autorama from Knoxville, Tennessee. They’re set up in the basement for the Autorama Extreme. Photo by Dave Gray