On June 4-5th, Wildwood, New Jersey, will take a step back in time for the 2016 Race of Gentlemen. Hosted by the Oilers Car and Motorcycle Club, the exclusive event combines a traditional, 1940s atmosphere with high revving, sand flinging racing out on the beach.

After last fall’s race was delayed by a hurricane, The Race of Gentlemen organizers made the decision to hold this year’s event in early June. Not only did this allow them to take advantage of the warm spring weather on the Atlantic coast, it also gave them the chance to host a second race in Pismo, California, on October 15-16th.

The Race of Gentlemen will be hosting their first event of 2016 on Saturday and Sunday. Here we see Mike Bogart of Troy, Ohio, in his "31 Jr." roadster up against Phred Hollister of St. Charles, Illinois, in his banger-powered '28 phaeton at last year's event. Photos by Joshua Elzey, TWiG Photography.

The Race of Gentlemen will be hosting their first event of 2016 on Saturday and Sunday. Here we see Mike Bogart of Troy, Ohio, in his “31 Jr.” roadster up against Phred Hollister of St. Charles, Illinois, in his banger-powered ’28 phaeton at last year’s event. Photos by Joshua Elzey, TWiG Photography.

Wildwood, New Jersey, is a hotbed of hot rodding activity during The Race of Gentlemen. From the cars to the backdrop to the participants' attire, the entire event is a total time-warp. The #88 Model A belongs to Alma Dhuyvetter, while the #74 three-window was built by Willy Snyder of Colorado. Peter Fontana and his chopped '32 made the trip to Wildwood from Switzerland.

Wildwood, New Jersey, is a hotbed of hot rodding activity during The Race of Gentlemen. From the cars to the backdrop to the participants’ attire, the entire event is a total time-warp. The #88 Model A belongs to Alma Dhuyvetter, while the #74 three-window was built by Willy Snyder of Colorado. Peter Fontana and his chopped ’32 made the trip to Wildwood from Switzerland.

Just like in the past, The Race of Gentlemen is an unwavering exercise in early hot rodding aesthetic. Only American cars of pre-’34 origin are allowed in competition, and engines must be flatheads or inliners produced before 1953. Organizers encourage participants to give their cars the dry lakes treatment by souping up their engines and leaving their windshields, headlights and fenders at home. With a total of 130 cars and motorcycles registered to run, the two-day event will be jam-packed with grudge racing on Saturday and eliminations on Sunday.

Despite the hurricane delay, last year's Customs by the Sea featured early customs from all over. This lineup includes Jeremy Minamyer's chopped '49 Merc from North Carolina, Chris Rusbach's '41 Ford from New Jersey and Kevin Anderson's '36 Ford from Indiana. Photo by Richard Toonkel.

Despite the hurricane delay, last year’s Customs by the Sea featured early customs from all over. This lineup includes Jeremy Minamyer’s chopped ’49 Merc from North Carolina, Chris Rusbach’s ’41 Ford from New Jersey and Kevin Anderson’s ’36 Ford from Indiana. Photo by Richard Toonkel.

The competition machines aren’t the only ones subjected to strict guidelines. For the third year, the Kustomrama team will be hosting their highly selective Customs by the Sea show in conjunction with The Race of Gentlemen. This unique event-within-an-event showcases new and old customs that have been built using pre-1952 components.

Alma Dhuyvetter charges hard off the line in her four-cylinder motivated Model A in 2015. She and her roadster hail from Wantage, New Jersey.

Alma Dhuyvetter charges hard off the line in her four-cylinder motivated Model A in 2015. She and her roadster hail from Wantage, New Jersey.

2016 The Race of Gentlemen poster

Kustomrama 2016 Customs by the Sea poster